Home Outdoor education Burning ban remains in place for Alexander County, lifted for 67 other counties

Burning ban remains in place for Alexander County, lifted for 67 other counties

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December 8, 2021 – The statewide burning ban, which took effect Nov. 29 due to dangerous wildfire conditions, continues in 33 counties, including Alexander County. Any fire more than 100 feet from a structure falls under the statewide burn ban. Additionally, the Alexander County Fire Marshal’s Office has issued a burn ban that prohibits any fires within 100 feet of a structure.

The NC Forest Service has lifted the ban on all open fires from Wednesday, December 8 at noon, for the following counties in North Carolina: Anson, Beaufort, Bertie, Bladen, Brunswick, Cabarrus, Camden, Carteret , Catawba, Chatham, Cherokee, Chowan, Clay, Cleveland, Columbus, Craven, Cumberland, Currituck, Dare, Duplin, Edgecombe, Franklin, Gaston, Gates, Graham, Greene, Halifax, Harnett, Haywood, Hertford, Hoke, Hyde, Iredell , Jackson, Johnston, Jones, Lee, Lenoir, Lincoln, Macon, Martin, Mecklenburg, Montgomery, Moore, Nash, New Hanover, Northampton, Onslow, Pamlico, Pasquotank, Pender, Perquimans, Pitt, Richmond, Robeson, Rutherford, Sampson, Scotland, Stanly, Swain, Tyrell, Union, Wake, Warren, Washington, Wayne and Wilson.

“The precipitation we are seeing right now across much of the state is doing what we need to do,” Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler said. “Forest fuels absorb it and conditions improve. “

“Residents of the 67 counties that are no longer subject to the state’s burning ban should still burn responsibly, check local burning restrictions and make sure you have a valid permit,” said Troxler. “Check the weather and never leave a debris fire unattended. If you are in any of the 33 counties still under the state’s burning ban, please be patient and don’t burn.

Residents with questions regarding their specific county can contact their NC Forest Service County Ranger or their county Fire Marshal’s office. You can contact County Ranger David Huffman at 828-632-5810 or [email protected] or Alexander County Fire Marshal Mark Earle at 828-632-9336 or [email protected]

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Q: What is surface engraving?
A: Open burning includes the burning of leaves, branches or other plant material. In any case, burning garbage, wood, tires, newspapers, plastics or other non-plant material is illegal.

Q: Can I still use my grill or barbecue?
A: Yes, if no other local ordinance prohibits their use.

Q: How do I report a forest fire?
A: Call 911 to report a forest fire.

Q: How do I report someone who intentionally starts a forest fire?
A: Call 911 to report a forest fire.

Q: My local fire marshal also issued a burning ban for my county. What does it mean?
A: The NC Forest Service burning ban does not apply to a fire within 100 feet of an occupied dwelling. Local government agencies have jurisdiction over open burning within 100 feet of occupied accommodation. The NC Forest Service has notified county fire marshals of the burn ban and asked them to consider implementing a burn ban as well. If a fire within 100 feet of a home escapes containment, a North Carolina ranger can take reasonable steps to extinguish or control it. The person responsible for the fire can be held responsible for all costs associated with extinguishing the fire.

Q: Are there other cases that impact open engraving?
A: Local ordinances and air quality regulations may impact open burning. For example, outdoor burning is prohibited in areas covered by Code Orange or Code Red air quality forecasts. Learn more about air quality forecasts at https://deq.nc.gov/about/divisions/air-quality/air-quality-outreach-education/air-quality-forecasts.

Q: Can I still use my outdoor fireplace or outdoor fireplace?
A: More than 100 feet from an occupied dwelling, campfires, fireplaces, outdoor fireplaces and combustion barrels are considered open fires and are subject to the prohibition on burning. Within 100 feet of an occupied dwelling, local government agencies have jurisdiction over open burning. All local burning bans are set independently. The NC Forest Service has notified county fire marshals of the burn ban and asked them to consider implementing a burn ban as well. Check with your local fire marshal for local restrictions.

Q: Can I have a bonfire?
A: No, bonfires are considered open fires and are not exempt from the burning ban.

Q: Can I have a campfire when I am camping?
A: Campfires would be considered open fires and are not exempt from the burning ban. During a burning ban, portable gas stoves or grills are alternative methods of cooking food while camping.

Q: What can I do to protect my home from the risk of wildfire?
A: Find out about forest fire risk assessments and preparedness and prevention plans on the NC Forest Service website at www.ncforestservice.gov/fire_control/fc_wui.htm or www.resistwildfirenc .org.